Monday, March 26, 2018

Joining The Milky Way Craze

So it is the season again to hunt and showcase night sky photographs, and my social media feeds are filled with milky way shots from all over Malaysia. Unfortunately, my recent attempt to get a milky way image was a failure due to cloudy sky and also excessive light pollution. With nothing to show, being desperate, I dug out my old milky way photos from yesteryears and shared them, for the fear of missing out. All jokes aside, it was fun to find the older milky way shots I have done while I was reviewing the OM-D E-M5 Mark II and the 7-14mm F2.8 PRO lens several years ago!






I think there is just something magical about looking at night skies and staring at the stars. The problem with me being based at the heart of Kuala Lumpur, a metropolitan city, is light pollution which retarded the visibility of the stars. In order to mitigate this, I do need to get a significant distance away from the city center, and find a place away from the street and city lights. Also, being in a tropical country, there is a 50 percent chance of rain and the sky has even higher percentage of being shrouded by clouds. I admit it is no easy task shooting the night skies. The challenge is not in the technical execution or the choice of gear, but actually in the hunt of a clear sky.

I will try to shoot the night skies again this coming May, with a bunch of Olympus passionate shooters. There is an outing to Sekinchan, with all kinds of photography activities planned out and I really look forward to that. All I can hope for is a clear, cloudless, beautiful sky full of stars. Th, en maybe, maybe I will debunk the myth of hand-held milky way shooting with the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II.

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2 comments :

  1. Many years ago I read in the (then) magazine Byte about some computing conference away from big cities.
    In the evening, it said, one of the delegates was missing ... and he turned up the next morning.
    He explained, that (being from New York) he had never seen the stars above before and had spent the whole night looking.

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    1. Then there was this 1994 incident in LA, a blackout happened and the residents saw the night sky which was unfamiliar to them. http://articles.latimes.com/2011/jan/04/local/la-me-light-pollution-20110104/2

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