Tuesday, May 10, 2016

The M.Zuiko 60mm F2.8 Macro Weekend

I was itching to shoot some spiders and bugs over the weekend, hence I brought home the M.Zuiko 60mm F2.8 Macro lens from the office. However my insect macro session was cut short as I had some last minute urgent matters to attend to. Not having enough insect macro shots, I decided to just bring along the M.Zuiko 60mm F2.8 macro lens with me throughout the rest of my weekend and I shot anything that I thought would look good through the 60mm lens perspective!

The thing about a macro lens is that it is not just specifically used for macro purposes only, it can be used to shoot ordinary, every day photography subjects, if you find the focal length to be suitable for the intended composition. I do find the 60mm (which is 120mm in 35mm format) perspective very tight for casual shooting, but it also provides very unique perspective, something that our eyes are not used to seeing, as we see with our wide (almost equivalent to 35mm) perspective naturally. Having such a long lens, with the bright F2.8 aperture can create rather dramatic photography effect, even for the most ordinary of subjects. 

All images were taken with Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark II and M.Zuiko 60mm F2.8 Macro lens

To have better handling, the ECG-2 external grip for E-M10 Mark II was highly recommended. 



This was shot at high ISO of 3200, considering the butterfly was hiding inside shade. Also, it was a little windy and the leaves were shaking a little, I needed the bump in shutter speed to completely freeze any motion. I think the image still looks good even at ISO3200. 





So I went window shopping and found this beautiful watch. I just could not resist shooting it, though I must admit the lighting on the watch was not exactly ideal. Shooting through window glass there was a bit of reflection, but the ability of the lens to resolve so much details, at such close up distance was incredible. 

Then I saw some pretty light bulbs

And I went super close up with the beautiful light bulbs. 

My watch is nowhere as fancy as the previous Tissot but hey, throw in some nice creamy bokeh, a little bit of blurry reflection on the table and interesting directional light, I think it looks pretty good. 







I do wish the weekend was longer! I have so much I want to do, more ideas to test out and shoot, but I just could not find enough time to carry out what I have had in mind.

Looking forward to long weekends when I just can shoot all day long.

18 comments :

  1. I really like the last three architecture shots. Keep up the good work, Robin!

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  2. Robin, these are great! I have this lens, and I've been wanting to just take it walking with me and see what it would do. You have inspired me to try it. I already know it takes great macros. BTW, I enjoy your blog very much. Thanks for the visits into your world.

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    1. Thanks for the kind words Kathleen! And yes you should take the 60mm lens around, it is so fun to use and see the world so differently!

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  3. is this lens usable for portraits? the equivalent 120mm is attracting

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    1. Sure it is! I wish I had more time to shoot some people during the weekend. You may check out my original review blog entries for the 60mm F2.8 Macro lens. I have some close up portraits going there.

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  4. I have it too, and agree it is a great lens. I find it a little long for portraits (I use 40mm on the 12-40 pro zoom) but it is doable.

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    1. It is a very long lens! But I am sure it works great for tight head and shoulder shots (or even half body shots, if standing back a couple of steps is doable).

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  5. Awesome images, the bokeh is a pleasant feature on this lens. May I ask a somewhat related question? Do you have issues where the focus peaking is deactivated at the half-press of shutter button (when using MF) in E-M1, and know how to prevent that? Thank you.

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    1. Thanks for the kind words. Yes the focus peaking is deactivated as soon as you half press the shutter button and so far I don't think there is any way around that.

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  6. hi robin, i just bought this lens (used) few weeks ago and still can't really take good macro shot can i tag along next time you shooting spiders?

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    1. Hey Wan Kay, I rarely do macro photography these days, and when I am free in the weekends I normally do street photography.

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  7. It looks better than the ZD 50mm f/2.0. Hopefully, it focuses very quickly.

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    1. While the focus is not exactly that fast in comparison to all the current micro four thirds standards, the 60mm F2.8 macro lens is actually much faster than the older ZD50mm F2 !

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  8. Hey Robin - good work! Speaking of macro, can you comment? I read that there will be an Oly 30mm Macro coming up. Any news about that? Also, I read that there will be a 25mm f1.2. Care to comment? Pretty exciting if true!

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    1. Hey David,

      I have no news on the upcoming products, when I get the news the time is usually extremely close to the announcement dates. Hence, I was always in a rush to do my blog reviews (though I am contemplating on slowing down in future reviews, to get better collection of images).

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  9. I have been using the 60mm lens for about 2 years now, first on a e-PL1, then e-PL3, now an e-PL5. I rarely if ever have to use macro mode for real close up jewelry pictures. And those hand held close up shots come out excellent. It's a wonderful lens on the e-PL5. Love your colorful insect pictures, almost makes me want to get a 5-axis stabilization Oly M4/3 cam body and give insect photography a try.

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  10. Thanks , Robin, to show me how amazing those lens are. Very good photos. Animals shots are awsome

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