5 More Tips On Using Olympus OM-D

Since my last video on sharing tips using Olympus OM-D went quite well, here is a sequel to that, with me sharing 5 more additional tips! I don't think any of these tips are well kept secrets, but I do admit Olympus cameras are not the easiest to navigate with, and certainly not the most user-friendly. I have conducted numerous workshops and photowalks, interacting with Olympus photographers from all levels, beginners to PRO shooters, and I was always surprised to find that there were some things which I shared that they did not know of, and some could potentially changed their shooting workflow!


Here is a quick rundown on what I shared in the video:

TIP 1: OK SHORTCUT BUTTON
The OK button is the much underrated and underused button on OM-D cameras. It is a magical shortcut that works in various situations. When using exposure compensation, by holding down the OK button, the exposure compensation value jumps back to zero. This also is applicable to a few other features, such as AF Target Area selection, moving it around the screen, the OK button being held down can bring it back to the center of the screen! Highlight and shadow control, the tone curves adjusting bright and dark regions in the photo, the OK button makes the curve straight again to the default position. Similarly, this can also be used when adjusting Color Creator.

TIP 2: BREAK SHUTTER SPEED LIMIT WITH SILENT SHUTTER
The mechanical shutter limit for high end OM-D cameras is 1/8000 second, and 1/4000 for E-M10 series. To break this limit, simply select silent shutter (under drive mode, with a "heart" shape symbol). For E-M1 Mark II and E-M1X, you can get up to 1/32,000 second shutter speed, which gives you two more additional stops of exposure advantage over 1/8000 second limit. This will be useful when using bright aperture lenses such as F1.2 PRO lenses under bright sunlight outdoor. The additional 2 stops advantage allows the use of wide open F1.2 to achieve the shallow depth of field effect while preventing the images from being overexposed.



Tip 3: INSTANT 1:1 PREVIEW
This should have been the default setting of OM-D cameras, but quick previewing to 100% view.
MENU --> COGS --> D2 --> PLAYBACK SETTINGS --> "EQUALLY VALUE"
Make sure you Press OK to confirm this setting.
Take note that if you shoot RAW, your 1 to 1 view is 5x magnification since the camera uses a smaller JPEG preview stored within the RAW file. If you shoot full JPEG size, or RAW + JPEG, then you get 7x magnification which is full 100% preview of the actual size of the image the sensor inside your camera can capture.

 TIP 4: C-AF WORKS ONLY WITH SEQUENTIAL L BURST
If you shoot with C-AF or C-AF + Tracking mode, and you are shooting continuous burst mode, make sure you only select L options, either mechanical (10FPS) or silent/electronic (18fps). The C-AF won't work with H sequential option (mechanical 15fps, silent 60fps). If you select H sequential burst and shoot C-AF, you only get the first frame in AF, and the rest of the images will be captured without any AF performed. Basically, S-AF only for H sequential mode.

TIP 5: SMALL AF TARGET AREA
This should be a common knowledge by now, but if you have missed out somehow, you can enable the tiny AF Target Area to achieve more accurate AF precision. At the AF selection screen, just turn the front command dial and cycle through different modes until the smallest one appears. If you are using an older OM-D camera (E-M1, E-M5 Mark II) then at the AF selection screen, press info, then cycle through the different modes.

I hope you guys find these tips useful! If you have more tips to share I would love to hear from you, leave it in the comments so everyone can benefit from you too!

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3 comments:

  1. Not gonna lie. Over 3 years using OM-D's intensively, THIS is the first time I know that press-n-hold OK button will do MAGIC!

    THANK YOU!

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    Replies
    1. Hah, I blame Olympus for not communicating more effectively!

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  2. This comment has been removed by the author.

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