Sunday, April 07, 2013

Less Talk, More Photos

Before we dive into my usual shutter therapy collection of photographs, allow me to direct your attention to a photography exhibition happening at the Refinery, D7 at Sentul East. The exhibition showcases a collective work from accredited local photographers in the Royal Photographic Society (RPS). You can still visit the exhibition, which should run until May. More info here (click). 

 I was there early this morning, meeting up with fellow friends Tai Foong and Ripi. After the event, of course we jumped right into the agenda of the day: shutter therapy !!

All images were taken with Sony A350 and 35mm F1.8 DT lens, unless otherwise stated. 

Walking Out


At the Roadside

Hot from the Stove

Excess Weight

Fast Food Advert

Hands Full

Bus Stop

Magazines and Broken Tail Light

Public Home

Waiting for a Bus

Broken Windows 
Image taken with HTC One V

Closed on Sunday

Friends: Tai Foong and Ripi

Where we had our Lunch

For this particular shooting session, I only brought out two lenses, the 35mm F1.8 and 50mm F1.8. I found myself using the 35mm lens all the time, without even switching to the 50mm. The focal length was flexible for a little bit of wide shots, as well as being able to move in for tighter composition if needed. However, there was one case where I truly needed a wide angle lens to get the shot I have in mind. Without hesitating, I whipped out my HTC phone and used the 28mm equivalent lens to capture the shot, which was the "broken windows". That shot became my favourite of the day, it was not even taken with my DSLR !

21 comments:

  1. awesome shots! =D photographer more important than gear XD

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    1. Thanks Sherrie !! Photographer more important, I agree!

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  2. I have the same bag as Tai Foong.. Is that Think Thank Retrospective 7?

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    1. Hey Cen Wei,
      Yes thats the same bag !

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    2. Hi Cen Wei,

      It's a Retrospective 10. Retrospective 7 wasn't available yet when I got the 10 otherwise I would have bought the 7.

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  3. I liked the Bus Stop and Walking Out photos, as well as your cell phone photo Broken Windows! That's a pretty remarkable photo, having been taken with a smart phone. I guess it just further proves what Sherrie says!

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    1. Hey Gregg,
      Thanks for the kind words. I had no choice but to use the wider angle offering, because what made the photo worked was the broken windows, but without the people walking beneath the building, the image lacked something !

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  4. like d bus stop & public home..i can see a stage of d people..sit together at d bus stop n sharing a lot of story among them with d same target "to take a bus"..while @ public home its look a like one family with different generation from grandpa till grandchild..luv ur photo robin..good job..
    *hadi nik*

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    1. Thanks Hadi !! Get well soon and we go out shoot!

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    2. yup for sure n thnx..really miss to shoot now..

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  5. Darn nice. Were you using the 35mm at F1.8? I know you like shallow DOF, so thought I'd ask...

    Peter

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    1. Hey Peter, thanks for the kind words.
      For shallow depth of field I left it wide open at F1.8, but for scenes which was a bit wider where I fit multiple subjects such as public home and bus stop, I stopped down to F5.6 or F8. Also, the blurry and panning shots were with shutter priority.

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  6. I like Bus Stop best. I often shoot with a mix of cameras and I used my HTC One X phone as one of two cameras for my first ever trip to NZ after I dropped and killed my E-PL1. If you take care, the photos from phone are just as enjoyable - the only thing is that the phone lacks various features not enjoyment.

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    1. Hey Ananda,
      Thanks for the kind words !
      You were right, if care was taken, the phones can do wonders. I think it is alright with the lack of features, it is meant to be simple and straightforward. For control and power we do have our DSLR or PEN to do the job.

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  7. I really like the Bus Stop picture.... =)...It makes me stare at it...

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    1. Hey Amir,
      Thanks !! I like that shot too.

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  8. Congratulations for this fantastic blog! Is is a great source of inspiration.
    What is the shutter speed that you have used for the panning shots?
    Cheers, Andrea

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    1. Hey Andrea,
      Thanks for the kind words.
      For the panning shots I varied between 1/5 to 1/15sec, mainly due to the slow moving subjects.

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  9. Robin

    This is another strong set of images. Of the series, I think the image titled Public Home is the strongest. There is a lot going on in this image and it has a very strong social statement in the details. Personally I suggest changing the title, or adding a sub-title, to "Ignoring the Situation" since that is the first thing that crossed my mind when I realized the juxtaposition (sp?) between the people in the scene and the expressions on some of the peoples faces. While many of the other images are nice and pleasant to look at, this one really has a lot to say.

    I suggest that you do two things with this image, regardless of if you change the title or not. First, make at least one big print of this image; though one of my photo instructors always said to make a minimum of three, one to display, one for contests, and one to sell. To really see this image and its statement it should be larger than what most computer screens will show (at least 11x14 inch). Plus it deserves to be on display at home or in your office for everyone to see. Second, consider using this image as the start of a project or a photo essay if you will.

    PaulB

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    1. Hey Paul,
      Thank you so much for the kind compliments ! That image Public Home is also my favourite.
      The reason why I named it Public Home was because at the top of the steps, there is a space just outside the roller shutter to a closed shop. That space seems to be a shelter for some homeless people in that area. Yet people do come and pass by the place, since it is indeed a public area.
      I am not too sure if this image is print or competition worthy, but I will keep that suggestion in mind. I may have taken plenty of "stark, gritty reality" kind of images, but I always imagine my own project or exhibition to be more toward the happier and sunny side of things !

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  10. Robin

    Your explanation of your title makes sense. Which is an advantage of yours and anyone that is familiar with the location. My suggested title was based on the expression of the man holding the little girl's hand and the other guy that is looking at them. You can almost hear them thinking "don't look at the guy on the step or the people sleeping at the top."

    A good project is one that compels you to work on it because it has meaning or importance to you. There was a New York press photographer named Arthur Fellig, who referred to himself as "Weegee the Great", and he made the most beautiful prints of some very gruesome subjects. There are several books of his work available. He also made very beautiful prints of "happier" subjects as well. The key to his successful images was his awareness of details in the scene and his impeccable composition. I guess my point here is a good project can have both aspects, gritty and sunny/happy, you just need to have the intent to work on it. Your shutter therapy sessions could be part of a larger project. Just define what your project is, be sure write this down, then keep this idea in the back of your mind so you will recognize when a scene might fit in the project. Though there are also times when a shutter therapy session dedicated to working on the project is a good idea.

    Check with your local library to see if a copy of any of his books are available, if not there is always Amazon.

    PaulB

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