Saturday, May 26, 2012

The Basic Camera Setup

While I was at a local camera store earlier, I bumped into a guy purchasing an Olympus Zuiko 50mm F2 lens. I sparked up a conversation, and he turned out to be a long time Olympus user. "I am guessing you will be using that marvelous 50mm F2 on an E-5?" I asked curiously. His response was warm and quick "No, I am now still using my old Olympus E-510". I was shocked for a little while, but at the same time I felt a wave of familiarity when I got that response. That particular sentence, still using an Olympus E-510, has layers and layers of meaning behind it. According to that dude (I have got to start remembering names) he loved how the camera renders the colours, looking so natural and true to life. He was very happy with everything that the camera does, and yes, he admitted that the camera is getting obsolete, but for his use, E-510 is more than sufficient to fulfill his needs and shooting requirements. He was so happy with the E-510, that he proudly added an important remark on how National Geographic actually spotted a photograph that he took through his blog and purchased the image from him, which was taken with that humble E-510. The fact that the camera is still fully functional without even the slightest hiccup speaks a lot about the durability and reliability of Olympus as a brand. 

All images in this entry were taken with Olympus DSLR E-520 and Zuiko Digital lenses: 14-42mm F3.5-5.6, 25mm F2.8 pancake and 40-150mm F3.5-4.5









I can totally relate to his stories. I too, am still using my first DSLR (not exactly first, but my E-410 which was snatched from me did not really count, so yeah) the Olympus E-520 (a generation newer than the E-510), which is coming to four years old now. It is an entry level DSLR, with very basic functions, extremely limited dynamic range to work with, horrendous high ISO shooting capability where anything above ISO400 is practically not very usable (unless you do a lot of noise reduction post processing). Give this camera to a kid these days, and that kid would not even want to have a second look at the camera. 

That brings us to the problem I wanted to voice up here. The days of entry level DSLR cameras are numbered.  Yes, it was partially due to the aggressive mirrorless compact system camera which ate up quite a hughe slice of camera sales lately. However, most mirrorless compact camera system (micro 4/3, NEX, etc) are still categorized under entry level cameras. I have encountered so many cases, where a school kid asking his father to buy him a camera, and the father asked me for recommendations, and I gave him a few entry level DSLRs (such as Canon 600D, Nikon D5100) and the kid just scoffed at my recommendations. They wanted higher end models, they wanted full frame cameras, that can shoot extremely high megapixels and high ISO numbers. They want larger bodies, with even larger lenses to match. I am not just talking about kids, I am talking about general photography crowd, especially the newcomers to photography, as observed locally here in Malaysia. When they started out on photography, purchasing their first serious camera, entry level cameras are no longer in the equation. When they see even the slightest noise at ISO1600, they would scream and compare that to a full frame cameras that can shoot clean ISO6400. 







I am in no way referring to working or professional photographers. If you earn a living through photography, by all means, you have the right to purchase the best equipment, best suited for your job, to deliver to your clients. No questions asked. However, if you are just shooting for hobby, and most importantly, just started on photography, don't you think you should at least start somewhere first, before going all out in equipment purchase? If you have the money and do not know how else to burn your cash, ok, I have nothing to comment. There were friends who would starve for months, eating bread and instant noodles, just so that he can save enough money to buy that 70-200mm F2.8 IS 2 lens. What is wrong with the lowly budget 55-200mm lens? Oh its not sharp enough, and the bokeh is not good enough. And more importantly, the lens is not big enough to reflect your ego, right?

I started with an entry level E-520, with mere kit lenses. I was often looked down by my peers, both Olympus and non Olympus users. Non Olympus users would say that Olympus will never be better than Canon and Nikon, and due to the small sensor size, the image quality will always be inferior. They marked my photographs down, based on my inferior equipment. I think I can live with that, because I do not judge photographs based on the gear that was used to shoot it, and photographs are a lot more than just technical excellence. What truly hurt me more was when Olympus users talked me down, saying that the original kit lens, the 14-42mm F3.5-5.6 was a crap lens, that it has so much distortion and how unusable slow the focusing is in dim light condition, that they said the only way for me to improve in photography is to upgrade my lens to either Olympus 14-54mm or 12-60mm. I agree, both suggested lenses were superior, and much better than 14-42mm in every single sense, but the thought of myself being treated insignificantly due to the small size equipment I carry, pushed the consideration to upgrade aside for a while. I stuck by the 14-42mm kit lens for quite some time, and I was shooting merrily with it. I did think I have made some good images with it. Although it was a lousy, cheap, mostly ignored kit lens, I still think its a good lens, and if you are patient enough to learn how to use it, it can deliver good results. After my photographs and blog gained some attention (thanks to you all beautiful people) the naysayers started to keep quiet, and again, the old saying that "it is not the camera that takes great photographs, but the photographer" can not be more relevant even in today's photography culture. 







I am using Olympus E-5 as my main camera now, and that was mainly because I needed the camera's capabilities for my paid assignment. I still bring my E-520 as the second body, or a back-up camera. Yes, the E-5 is way ahead in terms of image quality and performance, and everything else, but E-520 is still a DSLR, very decent, and very capable on its own. Why would I want to throw that away?

I think it all comes down to what you are doing with your camera. If you find yourself constantly shooting in extremely low light conditions, such as an opera show with poor stage lights, where you need to shoot high ISO at all times, then go ahead and be happy with a full frame camera. If you are shooting sports, and you need that burst speed and sophisticated focusing system, go get a D4 or a 1D series camera. Get the camera that does what you do. However, if you are just a beginner, shooting at random things, why do you need all that power and capabilities? If you shoot on the street, do you need to blast 10 frames per second? Do you even need to shoot anything beyond ISO200 under harshly lit sun light?

I have friends who shoot with professional grade cameras for years now, and when you ask them about metering, or the relationship between ISO-shutter speed -aperture, they will hesitate and cannot give the right answers. After all, if the camera fails to deliver the results they were after, it was so easy to blame the camera, and replace it with whatever newer cameras that will be released tomorrow. And you have reasons to brag and show off your new gear, and justify the purchase by saying (wow, you know I can now shoot ISO12800 on my 5Dmk3 much cleaner than my ISO3200 on 5Dmk2). 

Noodles with Char Siew

For this morning's shutter therapy session, I brought out my beloved E-520 and the kit lenses. I used the 25mm pancake most of the time, because the lens felt just right coupled with the E-520. Such a small and light combination, easy to handle, and such a joy to use. The image quality was brilliant. 

What I really wanted to say in this entry, is that, do not overlook entry level camera system, may it be the mirrorless compact camera system or beginner DSLR bodies. Kit lenses are not crap lenses, they are still decent lenses, capable of good results, if you are willing to work the lenses. More importantly, be happy with your camera, have a sense of pride, and you will find out that your camera will reward your faith and loyalty with great images. Get to know your camera well, don't give up on your camera too easily, and your camera will respond to your shooting style accordingly. 



58 comments:

  1. Couldn't agree more. I'm still shooting with my first- and only - DSLR, an entry level Sony A200.

    I particularly agree with the 'get to know your camera well' sentiment. I'm constantly amazed at how many people buy expensive cameras and ditch them after a few months or even weeks. I don't care how fast a learner you are; there is no way you can get comfortable with a new camera in that short space of time.

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    1. Hello Olli,
      My thoughts exactly. Knowing the camera is crucial to work around its weaknesses and bring about its strengths !! Only then we can maximize the camera's potential. And I believe there are no crap cameras, all cameras are capable to deliver great results.

      Delete
    2. I am still using my humble Nikon D3000. I don't think my photo is inferior to more expensive and advance camera. It is like if you can't run a d you purchase the most expensive and you are still running last.

      Delete
    3. I am still using my humble Nikon D3000. I don't think my photo is inferior to more expensive and advance camera. It is like if you can't run a d you purchase the most expensive and you are still running last.

      Delete
    4. Hello William,
      D3000 is a great entry level camera, simple and very straight forward. Glad to hear that you arent intimidated with more expensive gear, in fact, people should be intimidated by you because you could be using lower level, but at the same time, produce even better images than the others.

      Delete
  2. Hmmm an E-520 as 'entry level'? I think it's a pretty sophisticated piece of gear, with its in-body stabilization and all. Also, it has all the right knobs in the right places, so it's very quick and easy to operate. No, it's not weather sealed, but who needs that? Take a plastic shopping bag with you in case it rains, like a real pro. And yes, the glass is what really makes Olympus different from the pack. Almost Leica quality, but far cheaper. That 50 macro is a gem, but those kit lenses are pretty sweet for what they are as well.

    Superb photos like always Robin!

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    1. hey wolfgang
      Well, Olympus did market the camera as an advanced entry level DSLR. I do admit, in terms of features and customizations at the time of its release, E-520 deserves respect, pitching against peers Canon and Nikon. I still remember Canon earlier entry level DSLR lacking spot metering, and Nikon lacking proper exposure bracketing. Olympus has everything, and more.
      Thanks for the kind compliments !!

      Delete
    2. I think Olympus makes the best kit lens. I had the E520 with twin kits for 2 years before switching to Nikon. That's because our summer here in Vancouver only last for a month or even couple weeks. So high ISO became important to me at the time. But everything I know about photography and exposure I learned with my E520. I wouldn't know what I need to learn if not for the limitation of the E520. I pay great respect to Olympus as a company and I pay great respect to people who uses Olympus camera and produce great image. Understanding what we need vs what we want is important. I recently got a Olympus ep2 bundled with 17mm and evf for the price of less than a ep3 body. Yes, it is a old camera, but it feels great in the hand and produce good result. The limitation is there and I am not expecting it to replace my Nikon d90. And I believe gear limitation is what drives us to find creative solution to solve problem. No matter how great the camera is, it's the person behind the viewfinder that's taking the picture not the camera itself.

      Delete
    3. hey Apotpoc,
      Olympus does make the BEST kit lenses !! I also understand and can totally relate to you claiming that camera limitations are actually important to encourage our growth and learning as young photographers, looking for alternatives and solutions around the camera limitations.

      Delete
  3. I's sad to say that this phenomenon is even worse when it comes to motorcycles and guitars. My ears constantly tell me that it is better to spend $200 on a guitar and $10,000 on lessons and practice than the other way around.

    On the other hand the equipment "collectors" support the photography, music and motorcycle industries financially. Without them we would pay, Leica/Bimota/PRS prices for everything.

    I'm glad that they get great pleasure from owning "the best" but from the outside it's hard not to feel sorry for them. After all these years I am finally starting to accept that they are engaged in different hobbies than I am.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Hello Lorenzo,
      That was an interesting way to look at it, comparing to Guitar. I fully agree with you, I would rather invest on lessons, and lots of time practicing. Getting an expensive guitar wont improve my skills even the slightest bit !

      Delete
  4. Hi Robin, As I posted earlier this morning on Kirk's blog, when was the last time anyone looked at one of your images (or mine or anyone elses) and said "you should have used a more expensive (or more advanced or more professional or better or newer or bigger) camera?

    Peter F.

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    1. Hello Peter F,
      Very true indeed, we rarely (or never) had anyone commenting that photos would have been better if taken with better equipment.

      Delete
  5. Donald W Leitzel5/26/2012 08:49:00 PM

    Hi Robin

    I agree with Peter F.

    Know your equipment and use it well my DSLR is an E-500 with both kit lenses, but it still does everything I need.

    I rarely shoot above ISO 200. I also use a PEN E-P1. I want an EM-5 but I don't need it to enjoy photography.

    Don

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    Replies
    1. Hi Donald,
      Wow, E-500 !!
      If you have seen my macro works (insects and spiders), I shoot with E-520, relying heavily on its Image Stabilization and wireless TTL flash.
      However, I had this friend whom I admire a lot, he used an E-500, with flash mounted on the hotshoe. His macro shots run hoops around mine, no kidding. His control of flash, diffusion, and how he steadied his shots with his E-500 without IS were beyond me.
      It shows that there are ways to get what we want to accomplish, and they might even work better, if we are open minded enough to explore. I certainly learned a lot from that friend.

      Delete
  6. Kids nowadays!!!!....LOL....what you wrote are the reality.Sometimes, my friend also ask, why you don't buy canon, why you don't get a Nikon. Sigh! There's also a friend that ask me, what camera i'm holding, and I said Olympus, and he replied, is that a film camera!!! Sigh!! and I'm not saying that film camera isn't good...

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    1. Hello Amiruddin,
      We can all totally relate right? Kids these days, complain too much !! I would just chuck a point and shoot compact camera, and ask them to use it for 2 years before touching anything DSLR or advanced cameras. Seriously, start all the way from basics !!

      Delete
    2. yup, totally agree, before i use E-PL1, i used Nikon point and shoot, which i bought for RM399 only, and yeah i live with it for about a year and a half.....

      Delete
    3. I used compact cameras for 4 years !! I killed 3 Kodak point and shoot cameras... before I started DSLR. The last Kodak had full manual control (and it even has manual focus), and it was only RM600 (bought from Australia, heavy discounted price).

      Delete
    4. this is a street shoot wrapped around a rant. i chose oly simply because it was not canikon, and olys are smaller in hand, light and their glass impeccable! this sept i am going to melbourne! i can carry my e620 and 3 lenses ( 14-42, 40-150 kit lenses and the (used) pride n joy, OM 50/f1.8) all in little lowepro rezo bag! i am covered in all shooting conditions!lol
      my friend will bring her eos 550d, 1 kit zoom lens.
      btw, my first point n shoot was a mju2 :)

      Delete
    5. Hi richard,
      If you have not noticed I rant a lot !!
      Do take plenty of photos on your Melbourne Trip. Seems like you have everything covered indeed, I have been using the twin kit lens (14-42mm and 40-150mm) for quite some time before upgrading to better lenses. They were so small and light, and easy to bring around.

      Delete
  7. Yes. We all love the reviews of new equipment. However, the forums are full of new users buying new cameras like Nikon D7000 (and some Fuji models) and blaming the camera for the focus issues or other lighting problems. Sure there are a few lemon cameras out there due to some quality control issues, but often the end user with new camera does not know how to use it properly (I know when I see the settings they use when "new to DSLR users" post images with settings on sites like dpreview.com and ask for help) and generally blame the camera. Someday I may buy a EM5 camera (they are "pre-ordered" status in Canada mostly still and not yet much available here), but for now the Oly EPL1 which I have come to know very well after learning the control settings (which are a bit different than Nikons menus), turns out consistent and very good results for personal use. The bigger cameras are saved for pro use. Besides the money I save currently allows me freedom to add a few more m43 lens. Not in a rush for OMD EM5 but maybe next year. Or will it be a EP4 whenever that is ready?
    Students should take note that Pros and advanced amateurs can deliver great results from yesterdays camera models working within the limitations of the model, just due to the learning curve of the camera they use.

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    1. Hello Adrian,
      Sorry to hear that OM-D is not readily available in Canada yet, its everywhere in Malaysia now (and selling fast).
      I agree with you that OM-D may not be a necessity, I too, own a beautiful E-PL1 myself, and I absolutely love the camera. The image quality (JPEG straight out of camera) is very good, I rarely need to do much PP. As you have mentioned, knowing how to use the camera after spending some time with it can deliver very consistent and satisfactory results. The key element here is the user wanting to learn the camera inside out, and optimize it for personal use. Unfortunately, many people just expected magic camera that works all by itself reading the photographers mind and do everything without much of the photographers input. How I wish I can tell them that you have got to know the basics before you can make the camera do what you want it to do !!

      Delete
  8. Well put - spending time with the camera taking images is the route to beautiful photos, not buying gear. Or at least the route to getting closer to to what you want to express with your images.

    - Another Canadian waiting for an OM-D sighting :) I did come close when I was in Japan a month ago, but alas it was a mock up for display only while they wait for stock. Looked really good, though.

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    1. Hello Brad !!
      Glad to know that you also think spending time with camera is important !!
      No worries, I am sure soon the OM-D will arrive. Meantime, make great images with your current camera !! Wait no longer, go out and have some shutter therapy.

      Delete
  9. That is like everything in life. People mistake attributes with skill. For some others, they (again mistakenly, in my opinion) believe that this will save them money, by jumping to the best gear possible. The best is to switch gear when it is slowing you down,

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    1. Hello Vladimir,
      That is the dangerous thing there, "best" is an elusive marketing strategy that the big brands want us to believe, so we will constantly follow the moving target. Technology will improve, cameras will get better, no doubt. The only question is, will our photography get better as well?

      Delete
    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    3. I meant best for the person's needs. A beginner doesn't necessarily know where he wants to go. And, as you say, marketing doesn't help.

      Delete
  10. Hi Robin, thanks for the words of wisdom. This beginner will stick with the 12-50mm kit lens for a while, instead of feeling like I need the expensive new Panny 2.8 'X' zooms. Thanks for reminding me that it's about learning new skills, not about needing the highest-tech equipment. People were making great photographs long before any of the new stuff was even dreamed about!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Showyghost,
      You were right, people have been making great photographs long before any of the new stuff came out !!

      Delete
  11. My first camera ever was the EOS 650 film SLR and it lasted nearly 15 years. After that it was all digital point and shoots until the E-P1 came out. I liked it so much I picked up the E-620. I love looking back at the photos I took with that combo. Some time after that I picked up a well used and cheap E-1. Wow what a classic. That thing can take a beating and produced the loveliest 6MP photos ever. I could have shot with that thing forever, but the rear LCD was so terrible I was basically guessing if I got the shot. Really glad Olympus seems to be getting back on its feet with the E-M5.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Hello Wataru,
      E-P1 and E-620 are fantastic cameras. I have always wanted to get an E-1 just for casual shooting purposes. And for that "quiet shutter sound", and wonderful "Kodak colors".

      Delete
  12. The thing is to learn to use the camera, and learn to train the eye. Pictures like yours help a lot in this.
    I still use my E-510 + kit lenses plus some MF Rokkors as main camera...Sometimes i push to ISO 800 + Neat Image and is ok for me.
    When i purchased the camera I thought will be small in size compared to other systems, but it is almost the same. The only thing is the cheap lenses you can use from Olympus are the best.
    If i move will be to m43 because size matters.. small size matters more..

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Hello Anonymous,
      Do leave a name the next time you comment so I can trace back your comments.
      E-510 is a great camera, and I know when you said you need to have noise reduction on post processing shooting at ISO800.
      Indeed, these days cameras are getting smaller and smaller. Micro 4/3 is pushing the fact that having a camera at all times beats lugging huge and heavy gear.

      Delete
  13. This is a very well written piece. And it seems to be something that a lot of the well known (to me anyways) photographer bloggers are saying. Robin Wong, Eric Kim, Ming Thein and others are all saying that spend more on the time and money it takes to shoot photographs than to succumb to the never ending gear lust.

    Instead of spending 10k on that new camera, spend it on a trip to Europe for 2 weeks, with spare change to buy 4-5 photograph books e.g. Magnum Contact Sheets, HCB's works, etc to read while on the trip. By the end of that trip, you'll be a much better photographer.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Hello Aizuddin,
      Thanks for the kind compliments. You were right about spending money wisely: spend money to get good photographs, instead of spend money to get better cameras. Travel is a great way to open our eyes and see different things, in return we do see things differently.

      Delete
  14. Very good article Robin and quite timely for me as well. Very nice photos too. Thanks for doing the work.
    Tom

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  15. Great article. Can't agree more. I will work my E-PL3 hard for a few more years before I upgrade to the latest and greatest. LOL!! Thanks.

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    1. No worries Arowana ! EPL3 is a great camera !

      Delete
  16. I totally agree what you said. I have a e-510 and is still using it. Even a phone camera can takes good picture, if the photographer have skill. Look at the excellent pictures you took with HTC One v a while ago. Comparing the e-510 with a phone camera is like comparing a jet fighter with a propeller fighter aircraft. Thanks.

    Chi Lee

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    1. Hello Chi Lee,
      Thanks for the kind compliments, but oh dear, those photos taken with the HTC were disastrous !! I still think the camera in HTC sucks. I much preferred my old Nokia phone's camera.

      Delete
  17. 100% agree. I cannot take it when forumers mentioned" i will use m4/3 for travelling, however for serious work, I will stick to my dslr". Come on...I will question them back if that treat their travel photo less serious. It will create a mis-leading fact that small cameras cannot make good images.
    I too has resisted the OM-D for now as my needs for low light shots are limited. I still stick to my epm-1 and bought a cheap G1 Panny as a backup.

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    1. Thanks James for agreeing. E-PM1 is a great camera, though small, but the image quality is similar to its bigger brothers E-PL3 and E-P3. having smaller camera also means you will bring it more often, hence capturing more photography opportunities. That itself trumps large DSLR that stays stagnant in dry boxes.

      Delete
  18. Hello Robin,
    Thank you for sharing your photography thoughts and those story telling images.
    I was the first to be here days ago and now is my 9th time reading and digesting your thoughts and images.
    Form your images, YOU are good and you have mastered your eyes to 'SEE' what and how to captured in order to reveal the essence real daily life or human in motion. Compose, frame and press may sound easy but you have made those tasks embedded in your mind and eyes as it was reveal in your every shots.
    Camera? That's your second tools...any camera will do the works just find. You can not shoot what you can not see. BTW knowing the camera function very well is a must as you can not drive a car properly without knowing the lever.
    As such, I will give more priority to train my eyes to see as a photographer should see and capture those meaningful images as you did. (Learning how to see is my blog title which I delay to post until now. Tough topic for me.)
    Thank you, Robin.
    John Ari Ragai

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    1. Hello John,
      You got that right there mate, SEEing is extremely important in photography, and we should train to improve our own vision first, and see things differently before we can fully capture and translate the vision into photographs.

      Delete
  19. Hi Robin,
    Great article as always. I've been reading your blog for a few months now and find that you always write words of wisdom, a lot of truth and grounded perspective in this blog, thank you for that. I had to comment on this post since I bought an Olympus E-PL2 not that long ago and from a lot of what I've read on the net I feel like I'm supposed to have some problem with my kit lens even though I have a hard time finding it! Why is it that my kit lens takes great pictures? Did I get the only good copy?? I also have the highly regarded Lumix 20mm 1.7 and an old Canon FD 50mm 1.4 which are excellent lenses but for all the versatility that my kit lens gives me with great results for most situations I find myself in, I feel like it's a crime that I like it! Anyways, thanks again for such an excellent down-to-earth blog and keep up the excellent work!

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    1. Hello Patrick,
      Thanks for the kind words !! No it is not a crime to love your kit lens, I love mine too. It is so small, light yet very versatile. Perfect companion for travel. Of course people are expecting excellence and perfection from kit lens, but if they can look pass all those ridiculous expectations, they will find that the lens is capable at delivering great images, if they are willing to work the lens.

      Delete
  20. the e-510 happened to be my first dslr.I bought the dual lens kit for 900 SGD only. I used it for 4 years before upgrading to e-3 followed by e-5.
    I learned so much through the e-510 because of its limitations. If not for it, I would not have learned manual focusing,flash photography,using the noise filter and anti shock settings for night shots etc. Recently, I got to appreciate the e-510 more knowing that it is one of the few Olympus cameras that uses a weak AA filter, that's why the photos are so sharp!

    seriously nowadays, much of the fun of photography are taken away. with such good autofocus and ISO technology, one can simply point and shoot and get a clean shot in focus. That is why I always recommend people to start with entry level DSLRs first and learn to beat their camera's limitations with workarounds and tricks, that way they will learn and appreciate photography so much more.

    Shamefully I got myself 3 camera bodies over the last 2 years while my e-510 lasted 4 years with me. And with so many upgrades, the only "like" obtained on my flickr photostream came from e-510. This article has curbed my greedy lust to buy the e-m5. Thanks Robin!

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    1. Hello Junkai,
      I understand what you mean when you mentioned that the fun of photography has been taken away, due to the advancement of imaging technologies. I like how you describe the camera, being an entry level has the limitations which can be a good thing: to encourage the photographer to push the limitations with creative solutions.
      And there is nothing to be shameful about buying new cameras and lenses !! My blog entry was referring to those who thought buying better equipment is the shortcut to improve their photography, which you were already well aware is not the case. The fact that you still acknowledge E-510's capabilities shows that photography is a lot more than just the camera itself !!

      Delete
  21. agree with you, pa' Cik...my first DSLR is a second hand D90 + 18-105 kit lens, add tokina 11-16 f/2.8 almost a year later when i got great deal on it (also second hand)...after few years traveling with D90 i sold everything on february to move to E-M5 due to its size and i realized that i am a JPEG shooter & Oly is the best in that field

    now i will push back the E-M5 to X-mast shopping due to my underwater setup is the one that really need an upgrade, i use an old Canon A630...the sea getting too polluted so i need a better camera to capture fish image...hahaha...justification...justification...justification

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    1. hello Konikonaku,
      Oh I did not know you go deep sea diving !! Underwater casing is NOT cheap tho... but I am sure you will find enough justification to get one, if you really love underwater photography !!

      Delete
    2. not cheap indeed especially for Olympus UW housing, almost same as the camera it self...but its a passion that make you keep on going through your daily live...hahahaha...you got shutter therapy i got bubble therapy

      Delete
  22. Actually, the 14-42mm kit lens is a high performer with outstanding sharpness and has been rated as such in many reviews. The only thing that it lacks is its speed (in terms of Aperture). I took some amazing images with my E-520 and both zoom kit lenses. I even won second price in CBRE Urban Photographer of the Year last year with an image I did with my E-520 and the 12-60mm.

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  23. I cant agree with this entry more. I know a lot of people who upgrade their cameras constantly to the newest gear but have no idea about the most basic concepts -- Im taking about things like sensor size or aperture. I dont think they can even fully use the potential of their camera. What gets worse is when people invest so much in a body and end up with a whatever lens :/

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  24. Hi Robin, I just got a used Oly E-520 twin lens kit at RM1,000 this morning. I think it is really a bargain setup to complement for my Fujifilm X100 as to cover for different shooting situation. I knew the model was very old but I do believe in Olympus image quality as I used the E-P3 before upgrade to X100.

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  25. I did buy the OM-D E-M5 awhile after it came out. I wanted a smaller camera for hiking or vacations. I'm trying to get used to it, but it seems that when I want to have a fun day shooting.. just getting out and enjoying myself.. it is my E-510 that I grab. My lenses that I use most often are the 14 - 54 MM and the 70 - 300 MM. Love that E-510.. for everything except low light shots.

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